Skip to content

Ingólfsfjall mountain

Ölfus

Ingólfsfjall mountain in Ölfus is 551m. Ingólfsfjall is fenced with cliffs in three ways and very steep. When the sea level was highest at the end of the ice age, it was a steep head that the waves broke down and created the steep slopes. It is connected to Grafningsfjöll with Grafningsháls. Ingólfsfjall is mainly made of palagonite with lava layers in between. Ingólfsfjall was formed in the middle of the ice age.

To the south of the western corner of the mountain protrudes a gray cliff called Silfurberg, which is made of palagonite with light hole fillings that are mainly rayon deposits. To the south is Kögunarhóll and the main road lies between. Ingólfsfjall is named after the settler Ingólf Arnarson. Up on the mountain is a gray stone hill called Inghóll and it is said that Ingólfur is buried there. Below Ingólfsfjall on the south side is Fjallstún.

The Settlement Book states that Ingólfur Arnarson spent his third winter in Iceland on his way to Reykjavík. Later, a large farm called Fjall was built there and was deserted in the 18th century. Remains of ancient structures can still be seen on the site and are now protected.

On May 29, 2008, the source of the Suðurlandsskjálfi earthquake was 6.3 on the Richter scale below Ingólfsfjall.